Crunchy Toasty Seeds

A great texture addition to salads, in a granola, or eaten by the handful as a snack!

You’ll need:

    • 1 cup mix of sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, any seeds or nuts of similar size. 
    • a small pinch of salt, roughly ¼ tsp
    • rimmed baking sheet
    • heat-safe spatula
  1. Preheat oven to 350℉.
  2. Spread seed mixture on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake in the oven until the seeds smell toasty and just begin to brown. Check frequently after 10 minutes, and don’t stray far. 
  3. Carefully pour into a bowl or platter to cool. Ceramic or porcelain work well to quickly reduce the temperature for crispier seeds.
  4. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for about a week. Smell ‘em, if they start to smell plasticky, then the oils have gone rancid and they’re dog food.

Soft Pretzels

10 pretzels

4 ¼ cups bread flour
1½ Tb instant yeast
2 tsp sea salt
2 Tb granulated sugar
8 Tb unsalted butter, softened
1 ½ cups water
1 egg

Notes:
Lye is recommended to treat the pretzels before baking; this raises the alkalinity of the surface and aids in creating the distinctive pretzel crunch. Lye can be purchased online, and is found at many hardware stores as a drain cleaner. This should give you a pretty good idea of the intensity of working with this highly caustic substance, wear gloves, read all warning labels and be careful!

– We’re recommending a piece of specialized equipment here; the perforated sheet pan brings more airflow to the underside of the pretzels, while keeping contact with the pan surface. If you don’t have a perforated sheet pan, use a standard cookie sheet.

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl.   Use your hand to mix the ingredients together until no dry ingredients remain.  Turn out dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 10 to 15 minutes, until the dough is soft, springy and smooth to touch.  Place the dough in a large, clean bowl and cover the bowl with plastic wrap.  Set the bowl in a warm place and away from draft.  Let the dough ferment for one hour.  
  2. Divide the pretzel dough into approximately 10 pieces.  Round the pieces into balls and place the balls onto a flour-dusted, parchment-lined sheet tray.  Let the balls chill in the refrigerator or for one hour or until cool.  
  3. Remove the balls from the refrigerator.  Working with one at a time, flatten each ball with the palm of your hand and roll it up into a cigar-like shape.  Use the palms of your hands and roll the dough back and forth against the work surface, starting in the middle of the dough and working outwards.  Roll the rope out to 30 inches.  
  4. Next, take the ends of the rope and bring them together as if you were forming a circle.  Twist the ends together once and brings the ends towards you and pinch them down onto the bottom curve of the pretzel.  Place the shaped pretzel onto a flour-dusted parchment-lined sheet tray.  Continue shaping all the pretzels.  Let the pretzels rise at room temperature for one hour, then refrigerate. This is a good stopping place, you can pick up the next day. Don’t leave your pretzels in the fridge for more than 24 hours.
  5. Preheat the oven to 350°F.  Remove the pretzels from the refrigerator.  Using gloves, dip the pretzels, one at a time, into a 5% lye solution.  Place the dipped pretzels onto a cooling rack lined tray to let the extra bit of lye drip off.  (Remember to cover your work area while you work with the lye).  Then carefully place the pretzels onto an oiled sheet pan.  Sprinkle the pretzels with salt of your choice and then bake for 10 to 15 minutes. 

Sichuan-style Wontons

Serves 6-8

For the Wontons

1 lb ground lamb (substitute chicken, beef or pork)
2 tsp kosher salt
1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp ground white pepper
2 scallions, finely minced
1-inch hunk fresh ginger, peeled and minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tsp Shaoxing wine or dry sherry
40 square wonton wrappers

For the Sauce

5 dried hot Chinese red peppers (or arbol chilies), stems removed
2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns
¼ cup vegetable oil
1 Tbsp sesame oil
3 Tbsp black vinegar
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1 Tbsp sugar
1 garlic clove, grated on a microplane
1 Tbsp sesame seeds, toasted 

For Serving

¼ cup peanuts, roughly chopped (optional)
1 bunch cilantro, picked and roughly chopped

Equipment

Mixing bowls
Dish towel
Microplane grater
Parchment paper
Sheet trays
Large pot
Spider or slotted spoon
Medium saucepan
Heat-proof bowl

1. Combine lamb, salt, sugar, white pepper, scallions, ginger, garlic, and wine in a medium bowl and knead and turn with clean hands until the mixture is homogeneous and starting to feel tacky, about 1 minute.

2. Set up a workstation with a small bowl of water, a clean dish towel for wiping your fingers, a bowl with the wonton filling, a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet for the finished wontons, and a stack of wonton wrappers covered in plastic wrap.

3. To form dumplings hold one wrapper on top of a flat hand. Using a spoon, place a 2 teaspoon- to 1 tablespoon-sized amount of filling in the center of the wrapper. Use the tip of the finger on your other hand to very gently moisten the edge of the wrapper with water (do not use too much water). Wipe fingertip dry on kitchen towel.

4. Carefully fold one tip of the wonton wrapper across to meet the opposite tip to form a triangle. Seal edges of the triangle, carefully pushing out all air from within the wrapper as you work. Pull the two corners on the hypotenuse of the newly formed triangle to meet, moistening one with a little water, crossing them and pinching to seal. Transfer finished dumplings to the parchment lined baking sheet.

5. Make the sauce: place chilies and Sichuan peppercorns in a medium saucepan and place over medium-high heat. Cook, tossing or stirring often, until the peppers smell toasty and fragrant, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a mortar and pestle or a food processor and crush until it’s about the texture of store-bought crushed red pepper flakes, then transfer to a heat-proof mixing bowl.

6. Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Immediately pour hot oil over chili/peppercorn mixture (it should sizzle). Let cool for 5 minutes, then add sesame oil and set aside.

7. Add the sugar, vinegar, soy sauce, garlic, and sesame seeds; stir to combine. Set aside until ready to use. (Sauce can be stored in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks).

8. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add 12 to 16 wontons and cook until they are completely cooked through, about 4 minutes. Drain wontons and transfer to a warm serving platter. Spoon sauce on top. Sprinkle with peanuts and cilantro and serve immediately.

Dumpling Dough

Makes 40 Dumplings

400 g AP flour
1 pinch salt
1 cup cold water
1 Tbsp canola oil

1/ In a medium sized bowl, add flour and salt.

2/ Add ½ cup water and stir with a wooden spoon, until incorporated

3/ Add the remaining ½ cup water and oil then knead on a floured surface for 5-10 min until dough is tacky. Let rest for 10 min.

4/ Divide dough into approximately 40 pieces (15g each)

5/ Roll out your dumpling dough, into similarly sized discs, approximately 3″ in diameter

Korean Fried Veggie Dumplings

Serves 6-8

For the Dumplings

4 oz green, napa, or savoy cabbage
8 oz soft tofu, drained
5 oz mushrooms, sauteed (button are great, shitaake is better)
½ yellow onion, cut into chunks
1-inch piece ginger, peeled
4 cloves garlic
4 scallions, trimmed and roughly chopped
2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp sesame oil
Vegetable oil, for frying

30 gyoza skins (3-inch wonton wrappers)

For the Egg Wash

1 egg, mixed with 2 Tbsp water

Equipment

Mixing bowls
Dish towel
Microplane grater
Parchment paper
Sheet trays
Heavy-bottomed pot
Candy or deep-fry thermometer
Spider or slotted spoon
Food processor
Colander
Rubber spatula

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Drop in the cabbage; cook for 3 minutes or until fork-tender. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cabbage to the food processor; pulse until finely chopped. Empty the cabbage into a clean dish towel set into a large colander to drain. 

2. Add the tofu to the cabbage. Twist the towel closed; holding it over the sink, squeeze as much moisture as possible out of the mixture, then open the towel and transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl.

3. Combine the mushrooms, onion, ginger and garlic in the food processor. Pulse until finely chopped, then add the mushroom mixture to the cabbage mixture along with the scallions, egg, salt, cornstarch, and sesame oil. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary.

5. Pour the oil into a heavy-bottomed pot or deep-fryer to a depth of 3 inches and place over high heat; using a candy or deep-fry thermometer, heat the oil to 375 degrees. Have the egg wash in a small bowl or ramekin nearby.

6. Working with one gyoza wrapper at a time (keep the others covered so they don’t dry out), place a generous teaspoon of filling at the center of the wrapper. Use your fingers to paint the egg wash halfway around the edge of each wrapper, then fold over to form a triangle, pinching the edges together firmly. Repeat to form 25 to 30 dumplings, using all of the filling.

7. Carefully add 8 or 10 dumplings to the hot oil; fry for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown, monitoring the oil temperature closely and adjusting the heat to make sure the dumplings fry at that constant temperature.

8. Serve with Korean dipping sauce (recipe below).

Korean Dipping Sauce
Makes about ¾ cup

½ cup soy sauce
½ tsp sesame oil
1 scallion, cut thinly on the bias
2 cloves garlic, grated on a microplane
½ tsp sugar
A few cracks of black pepper
1 Tbsp gochujang

1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl.

Pork Gyoza

Serves 6-8

For the Gyoza

½ head Napa cabbage (about 1 lb), finely shredded
1 Tbsp kosher salt, divided
1 lb ground pork
1 tsp white pepper
3 garlic cloves, minced
1-inch hunk fresh ginger, minced
3 scallions, minced
2 tsp sugar
1 package round dumpling wrappers

For the Sauce

½ cup rice vinegar 
¼ cup soy sauce

1. Combine the cabbage and 2 teaspoons salt in a large bowl and toss to combine. Transfer to a fine mesh strainer and set it over the bowl. Let stand at room temperature for 15 minutes; this will help draw out the moisture in the cabbage.

2. Transfer cabbage to the center of a clean dish towel and gather up the edges. Twist the towel to squeeze the cabbage, wringing out as much excess moisture as possible. Discard the liquid.

3. Combine the pork, drained cabbage, remaining teaspoon salt, white pepper, garlic, ginger, scallions, and sugar in a large bowl and knead and turn with clean hands until the mixture is homogeneous and starting to feel tacky. [If you have a few minutes to spare, test your filling for seasoning: place a saute pan over medium-high heat and add a splash of grapeseed oil. Once the oil is very hot and shimmering, add a pinch of the filling to the pan. Cook until browned on both sides, then taste. Add more salt, sugar, or white pepper as desired. If you’re in a hurry, just trust your instincts and skip to step 4.]

4. Set up a workstation with a small bowl of water, a clean dish towel for wiping your fingers, a bowl with the dumpling filling, a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet for the finished dumplings, and a stack of dumpling wrappers covered in plastic wrap.

5. To form dumplings, hold one wrapper on top of a flat hand. Using a spoon, place a 2 teaspoon- to 1 tablespoon-sized amount of filling in the center of the wrapper. Use the tip of the finger on your other hand to very gently moisten the edge of the wrapper with water (do not use too much water). Wipe fingertip dry on kitchen towel.

6. Working from one side, carefully seal the filling inside the wrapper by folding it into a crescent shape, pleating in edge as it meets the other. Transfer finished dumplings to the parchment lined baking sheet.

7. At this point the dumplings may be frozen by placing the baking sheet in the freezer. Freeze dumplings for at least 30 minutes then transfer to a zipper-lock freezer bag for long-term storage. Dumplings can be frozen for up to 2 months and cooked directly from the freezer.

8. Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium heat until shimmering. Add as many dumplings as will fit in a single layer and cook, swirling pan, until evenly golden brown on the bottom surface, about 1 ½ minutes.

9. Increase heat to medium-high, add ½ cup of water and cover tightly with a lid. Let dumplings steam for 3 minutes (5 minutes if frozen), then remove lid. Continue cooking, swirling pan frequently and using a thin spatula to gently dislodge the dumplings if they’ve stuck to the bottom of the pan, until the water has fully evaporated and the dumplings have crisped again, about 2 minutes longer. Slide dumplings onto a plate, turning them crisped-side-up before serving with the sauce.

10. Make the sauce: combine vinegar and soy sauce.

Bread Classes with Bryan Ford @artisanbryan

Bryan Ford, or Artisan Bryan as you may know him, is the author of New World Sourdough and host of Magnolia Network’s The Artisan Kitchen. An experienced baker that focuses on Latin American baked goods, Bryan brings fun energy to workshops that will open your eyes to a whole new world and style of baking.

Sourdough Intensive

In this (5 hour intensive) class, Bryan will get into the nitty gritty of baking sourdough bread. From mixing techniques to high hydration, Bryan will take you from building your levain to scoring and baking your loaves. 

FAQ-2022

Q: Do you do in -person cooking classes?

A: Not at the moment. Classes are being offered virtually, we’ll see pop-ups this spring, and franchise opportunities are available!

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YES! We understand that giftcards have been moving around since our inception & not all codes look alike. If it begins with “THBRK”, type the whole code in the giftcard section. If it doesn’t, try the last 4 digits. If it still doesn’t work please email us (info@thebrooklynkitchen.com) with info to help us look it up (Name of gifter, name of giftee, any email address associated with the gift card- things like that) We’ll get to the bottom of it!

Q: Are you hiring?

A: Even if we aren’t, send over your resume & a cover letter to info@thebrooklynkitchen.com We keep a file on hand for when we are eventually hiring!